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Reply 1
I created a working example that might help.  It's a simple logging object for your applications that allows you to choose where the logs are being written to, either a Text file, database or email.

Although I'm still fairly new to Design Patterns, I'm a little torn between whether my example would be considered more a Strategy Pattern than a Factory Pattern.

You can read about the application here: http://www.kingwilder.com/Blog/tabid/55/EntryId/29/ASP-NET-Simple-Logger.aspx

And download the sample application here: http://www.kingwilder.com/Downloads/tabid/56/Default.aspx

I hope this helps.

Thanks,

King Wilder
MVC Central
http://www.mvccentral.net
King Wilder, Aug 03, 2010
Great post! As a side note, I use MVP(Passive View) for both WinForms and WPF apps. This has worked out quite nicely. Davy Brion has a series of posts on how he uses a modified variant of MVP with WPF (http://davybrion.com/blog/2010/08/mvp-in-silverlightwpf-series/). However, as Chrisitan mentioned, MVVM is the most used pattern for WPF and the one recommended by MSFT.
Aug 09, 2010
Reply 2
In your example, the interface is empty, your child class has not modified the parent class which makes it redundant. So this would be a completely wrong example for any design pattern.

Simply put, Factory pattern is all about having a Factory class which has a method to create a Product class you want i.e. you create create a factory producing the desired product. Here's a link having simple example in case the one here are inadequate: http://wiki.asp.net/page.aspx/310/factory/
Pankaj Mhatre, Aug 03, 2010
Got a 404 for the second link. Go to http://www.object-arts.com/downloads/downloads.html and then click on "Technical Papers" to download the PDF.
Feb 02, 2011
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